Sub-tropical build – Bringing nature back

Bringing nature back

Richard Proudfoot and his partner have brought nature in to their suburban block, at the same time as reducing energy and water use. He describes their house and garden build, and the satisfying birdsong-filled results.

IN 2008 we sold our small cottage in inner-city Balmain, in Sydney, and moved to Bribie Island, just off the Queensland coast between Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast.

Why a life on Bribie Island? My partner Fiona was born and raised near Royal National Park, just south of Sydney. I was born and raised in the Australian outback. We both appreciate the bush and as we neared retirement, we looked for a simple, sustainable life in a leafy setting. While we loved the inner Sydney vibe, it could never be called simple, and true sustainability was always going to be difficult to achieve.

Bribie also has arguably Australia’s best climate. In summer, the temperature rarely exceeds 29 °C, while in winter the temperature range is 15 °C to 25 °C, and annual rainfall is 1.2 metres. It is a great environment to use passive solar design techniques to build a sustainable, more self-sufficient house.

We bought an ordinary suburban (650 m2) block (of sand!), 200 metres from the beach, bordered by neighbours on three sides. Much of the time, a cool sea breeze from the Coral Sea blows across our block. The block runs east-west and has many mature trees on the back boundary.

 

So what kind of house to build?

Working closely with the builder, we came up with a design based on their classic Queenslander kit home. The house is elevated to catch the sea breeze and there is always cool air flow under the floor. It has verandahs on all four sides. It has high ceilings with a fan in every room, essential for sub-tropical days and nights. Most of the windows are north facing. There is very little glazing on the south and west sides, to provide maximum protection from the many storms which come in from the south-west. Every room opens onto a verandah, including the bathroom.

We wondered about building on sand, but our builder allayed our concerns. He used about one metre (depth) of concrete per footing. He couldn’t go much deeper because the water table starts about two metres below the surface. To date we have not observed any cracks in the walls, so our initial concerns appear to have been unwarranted.

Read the full article in ReNew 139.