Why test for air leakage?

Blower_door_testing

Energy efficiency consultancy SuHo explains the hows and whys of testing for air leakage in your home.

AN INTERESTING subject presently under discussion and development in the home construction industry is air leakage from buildings. You may have heard of terms like air permeability, air infiltration, air change rate and air flow rates. All of these terms relate to building air leakage testing, or ‘blower door’ testing.

What air leakage is and how it relates to home energy efficiency is commonly misunderstood. Air leakage is the unintentional introduction of outside air into a building and can account for up to 25% of winter heat loss. It occurs via uncontrolled openings such as gaps and cracks. Note that this differs from ventilation, which occurs via controllable openings such as doors and windows.

Testing for air leakage
‘Blower door’ testing is a method of testing how and where a building leaks.

It uses a high-powered fan mounted within an adjustable frame to control pressure levels within a building. The fan is mounted into an external door opening.

All controlled external openings (doors, windows etc) are closed for the test, while all mechanical ventilation outlets (such as exhaust fans) are left unsealed and internal doors are left open.

A blower door test is non-obtrusive and takes a couple of hours.

The rise in pressure elevates air flow through any uncontrolled leakage points such as gaps, cracks and poorly sealed door and window frames, as well as through non-baffled fans. These are photographed using a thermal camera, which differentiates surface temperature from cold (blue) to hot (red).

An added benefit is that the thermal imaging has the ability to identify such idiosyncrasies as missing or disturbed insulation batts, water ingress and electrical faults.

Losing just 5% of the total insulation area of a ceiling effectively halves its performance (based on ceiling insulation calculations from the National Construction Code Volume 2 Section 3.12.1.1 Building Fabric Insulation; see also ReNew 140, p. 84).

The result is generally a building fabric audit report, provided to the homeowner and detailing all results, observations and recommendations, and quantifying potential savings.

Read the full article in ReNew 141.