New glass is greener: Retrofit double glazing case studies

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Retaining perfectly functional window frames and replacing the glass with double-glazed units can save money, as these homeowners discovered.

Retrofit double glazing by Thermawood
by Carolyn Nguyen

The 1960s-era house we bought in 2014 had a compact footprint and good solar orientation. We recognised its potential and thought we could dramatically improve thermal comfort and reduce our power bills with the right kind of improvements. We started small: heavy curtains, pelmets and external awnings. In the ceiling, compacted loose-fill insulation was replaced with R4 polyester batts. Old air conditioners and gas ducted heating were replaced with energy-efficient split systems from Daikin.

Having installed new double glazing at a previous property, we knew of its benefits firsthand. It was initially at the bottom of our to-do list, however, because we felt the payback wasn’t worth it.

The first couple of winters made us reconsider our position. Our indoor toilet, with its louvred window, was effectively an outdoor room. In the bedrooms, warm air hit the glass panes and condensation would form.

Our old house had uPVC double-glazed windows from Ecostar. While they were low-maintenance, they required expensive specialty flyscreens and the uPVC aluminium look appeared at odds with the facade.

With the new house, we didn’t want to install windows that might polarise future owners, potentially resulting in the removal of said windows or the demolition of a perfectly functional building, so we knew we wanted wooden-framed windows. We also wanted to replace the louvres in the toilet with a fixed pane to minimise draughts, and replace the kitchen’s casement window with a bi-fold.

To replace all 10 windows (30 panes) with new high-performance double glazing and joinery, we got a quote of around $48,000 (in 2016), including an installation cost of $5000. Would that product match the house’s 60s aesthetic? We weren’t sure.

We decided to look at other options. One that appealed to us was from Thermawood. This approach reuses the existing window frames, so replacing nine windows with double glazing (28 panes)—the kitchen window was to be replaced entirely—would maintain an important original feature of our period home. Added benefits included saved resources and waste reduction. Plus, it would only cost $13,250. Unlike secondary acrylic glazing that is preferred by some retrofitters, Thermawood replaces the original panes with insulated glass units (IGU), which come with the option of being filled with a low conductivity gas (i.e. argon) and can be recycled at the end of their life.

Read Carolyn’s full case study and a DIY retrofit double glazing story in ReNew 143.