Home truths: notes from an energy assessor

thermal stratification

After conducting home energy assessments for several years, Richard Keech shares some of the all-too-common problems he sees.

Since mid 2015 I’ve worked doing building energy assessments in Victoria, mainly for homes and mainly on behalf of ecoMaster. In that time I’ve visited about 290 clients to inspect their premises. In this article I’ll try to convey insights about homes and energy based on my experiences. Some of this is specific to Victoria’s housing stock and temperate climate and some applies to all homes.

The assessment process itself
Winter thermal comfort is the biggest motivator in Victoria
I usually begin by asking clients what motivated their interested in an assessment. By far the most common response—probably three-quarters—is thermal comfort. Of that, most is winter thermal comfort. So whatever concerns people may have, it’s thermal discomfort that turns their interest into action. Given the current media discussion about energy costs, it’s interesting that cost is actually far behind thermal comfort in getting people engaged in the process.

People like to talk about their house
There’s an element of therapy about consulting on home efficiency that goes well beyond people simply receiving information about the state of their homes. It’s very much a two-way process. So patiently listening to people talk about how their home does or does not work seems to help people engage in the issue of home energy and comfort.

People don’t value professional advice highly enough
I’m very lucky to work for one of the few companies that consult on home energy efficiency. But even so, many people expect a lot for nothing, especially when it comes to draught proofing and general advice. Understanding a client’s home, sufficient to specify the many things typically needed to draught proof a home, is time-consuming.

The people who most need professional advice are the least likely to get it
A tiny fraction of households seek professional advice about their homes’ efficiency. And I expect that the homes we see are far from being the worst out there.

Tenants are missing out
Only a tiny fraction of our consultations apply to rented premises. Landlords and tenants both obviously lack the motivation to spend the money on a consultation because the cost and benefit incentives are misaligned. As a country we need ways to motivate landlords to improve their properties for the benefit of the tenants. This is worthy of a whole separate discussion; e.g. see www.bit.ly/TCRLOIC and ‘Energy-efficient renters’ in ReNew 134.

Read the full article in ReNew 141.