Rainwater tank buyers guide

109 rainwater tanks

Find out which rainwater tank works best for your household.

There is a rainwater tank for every purpose these days, with a variety of materials, sizes and designs. So what should you look for when buying a tank?

The first decision you have to make is where the tank will be located. Where you place the tank will determine its size and shape, and possibly even its colour if it needs to blend into the surrounding vegetation or dwelling walls. A large yard offers a number of options. You could place it next to the house or shed, or even under the house.

Tank materials

The six most common rainwater tank materials are concrete, fibreglass, plastic (usually polyethylene), Aquaplate Colorbond, galvanised iron and stainless steel. Each of these materials has advantages and disadvantages, so let’s look at a few of those.

Durability

A water tank can be a considerable expense, even after a rebate, so you want it to last as long as possible. The expected lifetime of any tank should be at least 20 years, and indeed, many tanks come with a 20 or even 25 year warranty. However, a number of factors will determine just how long the tank actually lasts, and that includes water quality, maintenance, and positioning of the tank.

For example, plastic tanks are relatively immune to damage from salty water, so if your tank is regularly topped up from a bore or dam, then a plastic tank might be the best solution. However, if your tank only needs to hold rainwater, then any tank material should be suitable.

The tank’s location can effect the lifetime of the materials. Ideally, the tank should be located in shade if possible, not just to keep the water temperature low and reduce evaporation, but also because some materials are damaged by direct sunlight.

Most poly tanks will slowly degrade over time with exposure to the sun, despite having UV inhibitors added to the plastic. Because the plastic is being used to hold water, there are limits to how much UV inhibitor and other chemicals can be added to the polyethylene, so eventually the tanks will suffer some degradation.

Read the full article in ReNew 109

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