ReNew 143 editorial: not just window shopping

143 Front cover 160 x 210 pixels

WHILE ReNew’s focus is normally in the energy arena, once a year we turn our attention to the building fabric, to consider sustainable materials/design and their energy implications. We’ve previously covered roofing and walls, and this time we give the lowdown on both floors and windows. Both of these really matter when it comes to energy efficiency.

Depending where you live, it seems that different sub-floor structures are in vogue. For example, in Queensland in descending order of prevalence are full concrete slabs, timber floors and waffle pods, whereas in the ACT it’s waffle pods that make up the majority of builds, according to 2016 analysis from CSIRO (www.bit.ly/2Fwzls9). We look at all of these floor designs and consider their sustainability credentials, highlighting some excellent resources along the way.

Your final floor covering might be a concrete or timber finish (look for eco-products) or it might include colourful all-natural linoleum or beautiful bamboo. For all products, the eco-credentials will vary depending on source and the materials used. Our coverage aims to point you in the right direction and introduce you to materials you might not know about already.

Continuing our building materials theme, our buyers guide this issue is on windows. Windows consistently top the list of interest areas in our Sustainable House Day surveys. We’ve updated our guide to help you understand the choices from double glazing, to low-e coatings, to films or other treatments applied to existing windows. We’ve also tracked down nine case studies from readers who’ve upgraded their windows, from full replacement with high-performing windows through to secondary glazing of windows and DIY glass replacement.

As feed-in tariffs paid for solar generation exported to the grid have reduced over time, there’s been a lot of interest in what constitutes a fair rate. The ATA advocates for tariffs that reflect the many benefits of solar generation and has been pleased to see several state governments move in this ‘value-reflective’ direction. One big change on the horizon (in Victoria, at least) is a time-varying feed-in tariff, which rewards generation at the times of the day when the grid needs it most. We help explain the proposed tariff and estimate the benefits over a flat rate.

We also look at Paul Hawken’s Drawdown project, present an ‘almost off-grid’ experiment on the edge of Melbourne, cover how to prepare your home for an electric vehicle, plus much more. Who knows, with the current level of media coverage and new EV announcements, perhaps 2018 will (finally) be the year of the EV in Australia.

Until 6 July, we’re running our biennial reader survey. It’s your chance to let us know what you’d like to see more, or less, of in the magazine. It’s at renew.org.au/readersurvey. We really use the feedback to guide our planning, so we’d love to hear from you

Robyn Deed
ReNew Editor

ATA CEO’s Report

AS WE change seasons, so does the inside temperature of our homes. For the majority of Australians living in energy-leaky 1 or 2 Star homes, it means going from being too hot in summer to too cold in winter, unless a substantial part of energy bills is spent on heating or cooling.

Helping to empower people to make their homes more comfortable to live in, cheaper to run and not cost the earth is what the ATA has been doing for 38 years. The great examples of what people have achieved in their own homes have filled the pages of many issues of ReNew and Sanctuary magazines.

As well as providing practical, independent advice, the ATA advocates for regulatory change to improve home performance. Currently in Australia all new homes and alterations/additions need to achieve a minimum 6 Star energy rating to comply with the National Construction Code. However, it is well-recognised that many homes are not performing at 6 Star once built. There is also an increasing body of evidence that the economically optimal level of new housing should be above the minimum 6 Stars.

According to a recent report from the Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council, 58% of Australia’s buildings in 2050 will be built after 2019, so improvements to the code and optimal performance are critical over the next few years.

The ATA is taking the lead and working with our partners in representing households and advocating for change to the code. We all deserve to live in comfortable, healthy homes that are resilient in a changing environment. You can support our work by making a tax-deductible donation to the ATA at www.ata.org.au/liveable-homes.

CEO, ATA

You can purchase ReNew 143 from the ATA webshop.