Saltwater batteries in use

Saltwater_Batteries

When the old battery bank gave out, it was back to diesel for a time at this significant conservation site in the Mallee. But an innovative off-grid upgrade has changed that and led to a significant improvement over the old system, as Trust for Nature’s Chris Lindorff and Tiffany Inglis explain.

UP IN the Mallee, along the River Murray in far north-west Victoria, lies Neds Corner Station, a former sheep property now being restored as a significant natural habitat by the not-for-profit Trust for Nature.

With an extreme climate—temperatures soar close to 50 °C in summer and frosts occur in winter—and no grid connection, this 30,000 hectare (300 km2) property presents challenges not only for habitat restoration, but also for the off-grid energy system needed to support the on-site rangers and visitors.

Purchased by conservation organisation Trust for Nature in 2002, the site is now home to two rangers and up to 30 visitors at a time: researchers and students studying the flora and fauna; bird groups conducting site surveys; works crews working on neighbouring public land; volunteers assisting with site restoration tasks such as reducing rabbit numbers, replanting local species and installing fences to keep out foxes; and the occasional corporate days and camping trips.

The site includes a homestead, shearer’s huts (used as accommodation), kitchens and conference/workshop rooms, with associated energy needs for heating/cooling, lighting, water pumping, refrigeration and gas cooking.

Energy system, take 1
When the property was first bought by Trust for Nature, the site ran solely on a diesel generator. Then, in 2012, philanthropic donations enabled the installation of a solar power system with a lead-acid battery bank. The system was designed to cater for an average of 25 kWh/day energy use, with a 25 kVA diesel generator as backup.

Over the following years, however, more people came to Neds Corner and energy demand increased, which led to the generator running more often than not.

Frequent, heavy cycling of the flooded lead-acid battery bank meant it performed poorly and reduced its lifespan. Following the failure of multiple battery cells in 2016, the battery bank was disconnected and the diesel generator again became the sole source of electricity.

Read the full article in ReNew 141.

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