Glazed and enthused: Window replacement case studies

Double-glazed windows waiting to be installed

Replacing the entire window with a new double-glazed one was the answer to greater energy efficiency and thermal performance for these homeowners.

Switching to double glazing as part of a renovation
by Anna Cumming

Last year, we did a small renovation at the back of our 1920s Californian bungalow in Melbourne’s north, opening up the space across the back of the house and putting in a new kitchen. As part of the renovation, we installed glazed French doors opening onto our deck and new windows in the kitchen; we also took the opportunity to replace ugly aluminium-framed windows in our living room and a bedroom with efficient new windows.

We wanted timber frames for aesthetic reasons and to fit the character of the house. Sustainably harvested, ideally local timber was important to us, and I wanted the flyscreens to be timber-framed too as they are internal and thus quite visible.

For thermal efficiency, we upgraded to double glazing, but did not dig too deeply into the precise performance specifications of the various options as we are realistic about our old, leaky weatherboard house—basic double glazing would definitely be an improvement, but top-spec windows, low-e coatings and so on probably not worth the extra money!

Our first step was to decide on sizes and styles and put together a brief for our four new windows and one glazed door unit. Two of the windows were direct replacements for medium-sized existing ones, although we opted for casement openings to catch breezes instead of sliding openings.

In the new kitchen, we replaced a large west-facing window that had admitted far too much afternoon sun with a long, narrow fixed glazing ‘splashback’ window between the new benchtop and overhead cupboards; above the sink on the north wall we decided on a 1100 x 1800 mm window with a sliding opening.

In the centre of the north wall, we replaced the existing single back door with a pair of double-glazed doors we’d been lucky to acquire for $100 several years earlier from a neighbour’s builder—they had been made the wrong size for the job. As part of our windows order, we had a frame made to fit the doors, with an extra window pane on one side.

We sent the brief (see box in article) to seven window manufacturers, a list combining recommendations from friends, companies whose work features regularly in the homes profiled in Sanctuary magazine, and some joineries local to us in Preston that we found via internet search. Comparing the quotes was trickier than merely looking at the final figures (which ranged from $4100 to $8300), as despite responding to exactly the same brief, the detail of each company’s offering was different.

Read Anna’s full case study and two other window replacement stories in ReNew 143.