A house built of straw

making_strawbales

You’re unlikely to go from building newbie to strawbale expert after a four-day workshop, but you should come out with basic skills, a better understanding of the process and the ‘right’ questions to ask. Enga Lokey explains.

THERE are many good reasons to choose to build with strawbales—better thermal performance, non-toxic material, agricultural waste product, low embodied energy, very high levels of insulation, beautiful curved walls, etc. But once you have made this decision, it may be difficult to find an architect, engineer and builder to provide the assistance you require in working with this unique medium.

One of the best ways to give yourself the knowledge and skills necessary for a successful build is to do a strawbale workshop. If you have no prior architectural or building experience, a workshop won’t prepare you to undertake your own project from start to finish unassisted; however, you will be able to gain enough understanding to ask the right questions of the professionals you choose to employ and also gain basic strawbale building skills yourself.

What should you look for and what should you expect from a workshop? At the most basic level, participation in a workshop should provide you with enough of an understanding of what you are getting yourself into to confirm your convictions or prompt a reconsideration of your building plans. Additionally, most workshops will give you hands-on experience with some of the unique aspects of building with bales, such as alternative framing techniques, bale tying, stacking walls and corners, prepping for render and rendering.

There is a huge variety in the offerings available. Before signing up for a workshop, ask yourself what you are looking to achieve and what level of participation you plan on having in your own project. The more you expect to do yourself on your own house, the more detailed and precise your level of understanding needs to be. Are you just interested in understanding the process so you can decide if this is the type of house you want to build? Are you interested in the theory and principles of good strawbale design? Do you want to participate in every aspect of the building process or just help with the bale walls and rendering? Asking yourself these questions will make it easier to pick the correct one. Some of the major differences between courses are discussed below, followed by a chart that tries to summarise the various options on offer.

Read the full article in ReNew 136.

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