Reusing building materials in the garden

permaculture-garden

There are many uses for old building materials in the garden to create quirky but useful structures, with the added advantage that the materials don’t end up in landfill. Permaculture gardener and teacher Drew Barr shares his tips.

Bricks

Bricks are useful objects. Durable and cheap, their regular shape means they can be stacked or laid in patterns. Almost all bricks have the same dimensions, although older handmade bricks may be slightly smaller. The size and shape are designed for easy one-handed handling by an adult.

Bricks are energy-intensive to manufacture and transport, but will last hundreds of years, and can be used over and over again.

When reusing bricks, you’ll need to clean them to remove the mortar. This is dirty and laborious work and seems very slow to begin with, but once you have mastered the knack you will be surprised how fast you can clean bricks. The best tool for this is a scutch hammer, which has replaceable toothed blades called combs. Chip at the mortar where it meets the brick and it will come off in big chunks. Wear gloves and a face shield though as flying mortar chips really hurt.

Broken concrete slabs
Concrete is also a very energy-intensive material to manufacture, and similarly highly durable and strong, and ideal to reuse.

Concrete slabs, sometimes referred to as ‘urbanite’, can be reused to make crazy paving, or stacked without mortar to form low retaining walls. When sourcing slabs make sure you get only non-reinforced slabs such as from council footpaths or old driveways. Reinforcing steel in the concrete is very difficult to cut, and as it rusts it will swell up and split the slab.
Councils often replace footpaths and must dump the slabs of concrete they remove, and they will usually be happy to dump it at your place for free.

Read more on reusing old concrete slabs, clay pavers, roofing tiles, roofing iron, car panels, bathtubs and more in the full article in ReNew 138.

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