All-electric and hydronic

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There’s a lot to learn from this highly insulated and well-sealed renovation in Melbourne, not least how a heat pump is providing both hydronic heating and hot water. Cameron Munro explains the house’s modelling-led upgrades and the tweaks made along the way.

WHEN we bought our 1910 weatherboard home in inner suburban Melbourne, we were committed to making it as comfortable and energy efficient as we could. We’d partially renovated a previous home by installing double glazing and injecting foam into the wall cavity, but our new home presented the opportunity to do a far more extensive renovation.

Our approach was guided by the German Passivhaus movement (also known as Passive House in Australia), which requires extensive insulation and extreme attention to thermal bridging and airtightness. We really liked this approach as it’s guided by building physics and requires extensive modelling and verification.

Moreover, we weren’t comfortable with the usual practice of simply throwing energy into a building to keep it comfortable; whatever additional heat we needed, we wanted to ensure we could keep it within the building envelope for as long as possible.

First things first: going off gas
The previous owner used a conventional gas storage hot water system and gas heaters. Our strategy for heating and hot water was always going to be all-electric using an air-source heat pump and solar PV.

We liked the simplicity of minimising our grid connections and had concerns about the carbon footprint from gas production and use.

One of the first things we did was to have the local gas network utility remove the gas meter and cap the gas main in the street. This was surprisingly easy to do, and cost us nothing.

Read the full article here.

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