A roof over your head

metal-roof-master-roofing-aust

There are many different roofing materials to choose from, but what are the advantages and disadvantages of each, and how sustainable are they? Lance Turner surveys the market.

IN ReNew 132 we looked at options available for walls when building a home or extension. But of course there’s more to a home than just the walls—roofing is equally important as it not only protects the rest of the building, but also has to withstand the most intense levels of solar radiation of any part of the home, as well as considerable forces from wind, rain and hail.

The roof must also be able to support added structures such as solar panels and solar hot water systems, satellite dishes, ventilation and air conditioning systems, as well as the weight of people walking on it while installing and maintaining such systems. Plus it’s used to collect rainwater for your home and garden.

There are many different roofing materials available, including corrugated iron and Colorbond steel, concrete, ceramic, metal and composite tiles, slate, shingles and even load-bearing panels such as SIPs (structural insulated panels). Each option has its advantages and disadvantages, each has its own particular look, and each comes in a range of options for that particular material.

Which roofing you go for will depend in part on the materials and the general look of the rest of the home, as well as your personal preference, which may be determined by a number of factors including appearance, the eco-credentials of the material, the range of colours and styles available, the building method (some roofing materials need more structural support than others), the level of maintenance you are willing to give to the roof, the fire resistance level required, and, of course, the location and hence surrounding environment of the home, including heritage or aesthetic requirements of your local council.

The article looks at each material in turn and also considers roof pitch, insulation and keeping your roof cool.

Read the full article in ReNew 138.

Sign up to ReNew‘s monthly eNewsletter and receive a free back issue!

Receive the latest sustainability news, articles, events, giveaways and special deals from ReNew magazine.

We’ll send you ReNew 133 as a free download from our webshop when your sign up has been confirmed. Please check your email account for our confirmation email.

×