In ‘Sustainable houses’ Category

ReNew Editor, Robyn Deed

ReNew 138 editorial: Looking up – what’s on your roof?

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WHEN it comes to sustainable building, there’s a lot of material to cover, so we’re making our way around the building process, bit by bit. Having previously looked at ‘what’s in a wall’ (in ReNew 132), this time we’re hitting the roof.

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We delve into the various roofing materials and their sustainability, along with the importance of roof pitch, insulation and colour to a house’s thermal performance. We also look at green roofs, with great resources for finding out more on this home/urban cooling option (with a lovely leafy example featuring on our cover).

With 1.5 million roofs in Australia also housing solar panels, it could be argued that our roofs (and communities) are leading the way in a renewable transition for Australia. But that’s not been without its naysayers and challenges, so ATA expert Andrew Reddaway tackles the issues and solutions needed for a successful shift to 100% renewables. It’s a must-read to correct misconceptions about how renewables work with the grid, particularly given the recent blackout in South Australia and discussions around the closure of Hazelwood.

As well as roofs, we also consider windows—or at least ways to shade them. With a warmer than average summer on the cards, it’s a good time to make sure your home will cope as well as possible in the heat. Keeping the sun off your windows is an important first step, but it’s not always as simple as putting up a blind. In our external shading buyers guide, we look at how to get it right: which windows to shade, how much shade, what materials to use and should shades be fixed, adjustable or even removable to avoid excluding the sun when you need it.

Gardens also provide a cooling benefit, and vertical gardens are a way to get greenery in places where that might not otherwise be feasible. Gardening in pots can be tricky though, so we feature two successful examples, with the message from both being to experiment to get the right plants, and that automatic watering is a must. The other message is that the owners love having herbs and greenery right at the back door!

We hope our article on reusing building materials in the garden will inspire you to find ways to source preloved bricks, concrete tiles or other materials to use for both practical and creative purposes in the garden. The author has been working with high school students to build a permaculture garden from mostly reused materials—and we get to benefit from their ingenuity and enthusiasm with some great examples to copy at home.

Of course, there’s much more besides: an EV owner’s insights into charging, including the knotty issue of kerbside charging for those without driveways, DIY wicking beds using a waste product, an introduction to timber finishes, islands leading the way in sustainability, DIY pressed earth bricks, and much more! We wish you a happy and safe holiday season and look forward to hearing from you in the new year.

Robyn Deed
ReNew Editor

ATA CEO’s Report

IT HAS been a whirlwind past few months, with major shifts in global politics like the recent election of Donald Trump as US president and the Brexit vote causing great uncertainty in the area of climate policy.

Thankfully there was a firm commitment from the countries attending the Marrakech Climate Change Conference in November to show the world that the implementation of the Paris Agreement is underway, and the constructive spirit of multilateral cooperation on climate change continues.

While the Australian Government announced ratification of the treaty at Marrakech, it is still unclear how at a federal level we will achieve our carbon reduction commitments. Several states and territories including the ACT, Vic, SA, Qld and NSW are taking the lead, setting more ambitious targets and other mechanisms to combat emissions.

So much uncertainty and change once again highlights the role the community needs to take in not only advocating for effective government policy but getting on with the job. And we need to make sure everyone in the community comes along on the journey.

There is no better example of practical sustainability than community renewable energy. There are now more than 80 community energy groups and 50 projects up and running across Australia. In February 2017, these groups will be gathering in Melbourne for the second Community Energy Congress to share information, develop skills, foster new networks, celebrate success and plan for action. The ATA is proudly one of the organisers of the conference and we look forward to seeing you there. For more information, go to c4ce.net.au/congress.

Donna Luckman
CEO, ATA

You can purchase ReNew 138 from the ATA webshop.

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What’s in a timber finish?

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Choose right, prepare well and work with the timber’s properties: Peter Smyth delves into the issues to consider when selecting and using timber finishes.

What are we talking about when we say we are finishing timber rather than painting it? Perhaps the most fundamental and obvious difference is that we care what the underlying timber looks like. We have gone from regarding the timber purely as a functional substrate to using it for its aesthetic properties.

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This has a number of consequences. The first is that how we prepare the timber for the finish is of much greater importance; this includes obvious points such as not filling holes with an undesirable colour, to more subtle concerns such as how we sand the timber. Second, we are often using the finish not just to preserve the timber but also to enhance its look, so the timber and finish must work in a kind of symbiosis. This relationship is at the heart of what we are trying to do when we finish timber and there are a multitude of ways it has been approached over the years.

Timber selection

Not all timber is created equal and through all of what follows it is worth bearing in mind the importance of appropriate timber selection. This is particularly important in outdoor applications, with some species being more susceptible than others to weathering, termites and other forms of ageing and decay. A wealth of information exists in this area; see links at end.

Read the full article in ReNew 138.

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A roof over your head

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There are many different roofing materials to choose from, but what are the advantages and disadvantages of each, and how sustainable are they? Lance Turner surveys the market.

IN ReNew 132 we looked at options available for walls when building a home or extension. But of course there’s more to a home than just the walls—roofing is equally important as it not only protects the rest of the building, but also has to withstand the most intense levels of solar radiation of any part of the home, as well as considerable forces from wind, rain and hail.

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The roof must also be able to support added structures such as solar panels and solar hot water systems, satellite dishes, ventilation and air conditioning systems, as well as the weight of people walking on it while installing and maintaining such systems. Plus it’s used to collect rainwater for your home and garden.

There are many different roofing materials available, including corrugated iron and Colorbond steel, concrete, ceramic, metal and composite tiles, slate, shingles and even load-bearing panels such as SIPs (structural insulated panels). Each option has its advantages and disadvantages, each has its own particular look, and each comes in a range of options for that particular material.

Which roofing you go for will depend in part on the materials and the general look of the rest of the home, as well as your personal preference, which may be determined by a number of factors including appearance, the eco-credentials of the material, the range of colours and styles available, the building method (some roofing materials need more structural support than others), the level of maintenance you are willing to give to the roof, the fire resistance level required, and, of course, the location and hence surrounding environment of the home, including heritage or aesthetic requirements of your local council.

The article looks at each material in turn and also considers roof pitch, insulation and keeping your roof cool.

Read the full article in ReNew 138.

vertical-garden

Straight up: vertical garden design

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The last thing you want is to spend a lot of money on a vertical garden system and then have it fail. Jenny and Bevan Bates provide advice and inspiration from their own living walls—five years old and growing strong!

THE inspiration to garden vertically is not new. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, if they are more than legend, may have been an early precursor, built to bring luscious greenery to the ancient city’s terraced buildings. Your grandma’s hanging pots are a more down-to-earth example, as are vines on a trellis.

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More recently, the idea of living walls has become a popular trend, in part in response to higher density living and homes with small gardens. For Jenny and Bevan Bates, their move to a new house with a small courtyard— and a stark black brick wall facing their living area windows—was the reason they started experimenting with gardening on a wall.

“You have to be prepared to experiment,” says Jenny. In fact, their first vertical garden was a failure. “We tried a $100 system, but the pots were too small and it dried out too quickly; it was hard to keep anything alive in it,” she says.

However, they persevered and they now have five vertical gardens providing cooling, colour and herbs, which adds interest to their home. The black brick wall in fact sets off one of the vertical gardens nicely—the colour they didn’t like turned out to be complementary to the planting!

That particular garden was their first success, says Jenny. It’s now five years old and thriving. It’s on a south-facing wall overlooked by the north-facing living area windows—a lovely sight.

They created the garden using Woolly Pockets, a product which at the time they needed to get delivered from the USA (though there are now retailers in Australia).

The pockets are composed of long troughs of recycled polyethylene (PET, from milk bottles for example). That recycled aspect was important to them; “You need to think about the full life cycle; for systems made from virgin plastic, there can be a lot to dispose of at end of life,” says Jenny.

Which plants they use has evolved over time; some plants grew bigger than expected, shaded other plants or didn’t like the position.

Read about their vertical garden in ReNew 138.

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Reusing building materials in the garden

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There are many uses for old building materials in the garden to create quirky but useful structures, with the added advantage that the materials don’t end up in landfill. Permaculture gardener and teacher Drew Barr shares his tips.

Bricks

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Bricks are useful objects. Durable and cheap, their regular shape means they can be stacked or laid in patterns. Almost all bricks have the same dimensions, although older handmade bricks may be slightly smaller. The size and shape are designed for easy one-handed handling by an adult.

Bricks are energy-intensive to manufacture and transport, but will last hundreds of years, and can be used over and over again.

When reusing bricks, you’ll need to clean them to remove the mortar. This is dirty and laborious work and seems very slow to begin with, but once you have mastered the knack you will be surprised how fast you can clean bricks. The best tool for this is a scutch hammer, which has replaceable toothed blades called combs. Chip at the mortar where it meets the brick and it will come off in big chunks. Wear gloves and a face shield though as flying mortar chips really hurt.

Broken concrete slabs
Concrete is also a very energy-intensive material to manufacture, and similarly highly durable and strong, and ideal to reuse.

Concrete slabs, sometimes referred to as ‘urbanite’, can be reused to make crazy paving, or stacked without mortar to form low retaining walls. When sourcing slabs make sure you get only non-reinforced slabs such as from council footpaths or old driveways. Reinforcing steel in the concrete is very difficult to cut, and as it rusts it will swell up and split the slab.
Councils often replace footpaths and must dump the slabs of concrete they remove, and they will usually be happy to dump it at your place for free.

Read more on reusing old concrete slabs, clay pavers, roofing tiles, roofing iron, car panels, bathtubs and more in the full article in ReNew 138.

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DIY earth bricks

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Creating pressed earth bricks isn’t hard when you have a machine and willing helpers. John Hermans describes the process and advantages of this low embodied energy approach to construction.

THIS article aims to inspire owner-builders to minimise the carbon footprint of their new sustainable dwellings by using pressed earth bricks. By explaining the many virtues of this building material, I hope to spark interest in my offer to share the amazing machine that I use to make them.

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I started making and using pressed earth bricks in 1988, shortly after commencing excavation for our house site. I had seen a hydraulic brick press working very effectively around this time and, with the intent of making a copy, I took several photographs of it in operation. I then found four aspiring owner-builder friends who were willing to become ‘shareholders’ and finance the brick press fabrication; my input was to build it.

The machine I built back then is still going strong today. To date, this press has made in excess of 70,000 bricks and has been responsible for some very creative, cost-efficient and low embodied energy housing.

A pressed earth brick is simply a brick made by compacting soil that has a high percentage of clay. The machine compacts the soil by 50% using the power of a hydraulic press. The result is an attractive and easy-to-use brick that needs no firing and can often be made from subsoil excavated from the house site— and thus has much lower embodied energy than the average house brick.

My machine makes bricks that are 300 mm long by 220 mm wide by approximately 130 mm high, so quite a bit larger than the average house brick (dimensions 230 x 110 x 76 mm). The height of the brick depends on the amount of clay mix put into the press, but averages around 130 mm. At that size, the brick ends up weighing around 15 kg.

It is important to seal the bricks to prevent surface erosion. There are many earth brick sealing products available now (e.g. Your Home suggests linseed oil and turpentine; or you can use one of the Bondall products).

Quality bricks are achieved by using a clay-based subsoil that will bind well and dry hard. This is often an excavation waste product, with little commercial value. Using a press to make several test bricks is a sensible idea.

An addition of 5% to 10% cement will form a brick that will handle days of total water submergence, although this is a condition rarely encountered! No cement is needed in the mix if the bricks are used indoors. If used in exterior walls that are likely to be impacted by rain, then the use of cement is recommended.

Read the full details in ReNew 138.

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ATA member profile: Ripples in the community

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Long-time ATA member Ali Campbell has no qualms about buying secondhand instead of new and looks at all purchases through a “green lens.” She talks to Jodie Lea Martire about how community is critical to sustainability.

ALI Campbell couldn’t bear to see her old piano go to waste, so it stands in the chook shed as a piece of art. It’s a good demonstration of her creative commitment to sustainability, which has led from high eco-living standards at home to diverse community involvement. As Ali says, being part of an active community “helps sustain you and recharges you for staying in the sustainability field.”

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Bushwalking and camping gave Ali a connection with nature, but her real evolution towards environmental action came with her first child. She and husband Bruce had been “unwise, unwary consumers until that point”, but they realised that every other parent had also needed clothes, cots and change tables so they could use “secondhand everything.” From there, the Campbells took a good look at their “consumption and stuff.” They reduced purchases, packaging and waste, considered where their food and goods came from, and boosted their home chook-and-vegie garden.

The garden led to conversations about sustainability with others, and builder Duncan Hall put Ali and Bruce on to the ATA. Soon, the family was experimenting with solar stoves, and now “everything we do has that green lens.”

They have worked to reduce their home’s environmental impact, including greywater systems, water tanks, double-glazed windows, reorienting for better lighting and using Australian-made materials. Ali used ATA-sourced information to explain her decisions to both their builder and plumber during renovations, and emphasises that it’s crucial to hire workers who ‘get it’ and aren’t just greenwashing their work.

Ali says, “The community thing is critical. It goes without saying, but it needs to be said.” She spent six or so years volunteering as an organiser with Melbourne’s Sustainable Living Festival (SLF), and gardened with the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Gardens in Altona Meadows for a time. She is also active on the Inner West Buy Swap Sell and Freecycle Facebook groups.

Ali participates in Transition Hobsons Bay (THB), and she and Virginia Millard run the Give Take Stand: an unstaffed booth where people share quality, unwanted items (like a free op shop). Ali says the autonomous setup has strengthened community involvement without forcing obligation or onus on anyone. It has been hosted in venues around Hobsons Bay and the council is providing funds to boost the work and establish the stand as a waterproof outdoor shed.

Another project Ali organises through SLF and the transitions group is Bunches of Lunches. Now in its third year, Ali and Transitions Hobsons Bay member Tarius McArthur run three-hour sessions which teach participants to cook five healthy, freezable dishes suitable for school lunches—and promote local food, low packaging and low energy use.

Ali and Bruce have also combined their home and community efforts by signing up their new seven-seater VW Caddy to Car Next Door, allowing locals to rent their vehicle. This let the Campbells balance their need for a second car every now and then, while knowing they’re “not just sitting on this asset.”

Reading ReNew gives Ali great ideas, a sense that she’s not alone in her activism, and—most importantly—hope. The magazine’s coverage of policy developments, news analysis and innovations provides “positivity and support, and that’s what keeps her doing this.”

To end with Ali’s own assessment of her environmental contribution: “I can feel frustrated because I’m not creating seismic change, but I hear frequently, most weeks, ‘You’d love this, Ali!’, so I know I’m having a ripple effect around me and I just hope that keeps rippling on and on.”

This member profile is published in ReNew 138. Buy your copy here.

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Tassie off-grid home

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Given their distance from the nearest power pole, it made sense financially as well as philosophically for this Sydney couple to go off-grid in their new home in Tasmania. Peter Tuft describes how they went about it.

As we approached retirement my wife Robyn and I knew we did not want to spend the rest of our lives in Sydney. Sydney’s natural environment is glorious but it is also much too busy, too hot and humid in summer, and our house was too cold and hard to heat in winter. We had loved Tasmania since bushwalking there extensively in the 1970s and it has a lovely cool climate, so it was an obvious choice.

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We narrowed the selection to somewhere within one hour‘s drive of Hobart, then on a reconnaissance trip narrowed it further to the Channel region to the south. It has lush forests and scattered pasture with the sheltered d’Entrecasteaux Channel on one side and tall hills behind—just beautiful. And we were extraordinarily lucky to quickly find an 80 hectare lot which had all those elements plus extensive views over the Channel and Bruny Island to the Tasman Peninsula. It was a fraction of the cost of a Sydney suburban lot.

The decision to buy was in 2008 but building did not start until 2014 so we had plenty of time to think about what and how to build. We have always been interested in sustainability, and renewable energy in particular, even before they became so obviously necessary: my engineering undergraduate thesis in 1975 was on a solar heater and Robyn worked for many years on wastewater treatment and stream water quality. There was never any doubt that we would make maximum use of renewable energy and alternative waste disposal methods.

From the beginning we knew the house would be of passive solar thermal design. The house sits high on a hill (for the views!) and faces north-east. The main living room is entirely glass-fronted, about 11m long and up to 4m high with wide eaves. That allows huge solar input to the floor of polished concrete. A slight downside is that there is potential for it to be too warm in summer, but we’ve managed that with shade blinds and ventilation and so far it has not been a problem. All walls, floor and roof are well insulated, even the garage door, and all windows are double-glazed. Supplementary heating is via a wood heater set in a massive stone fireplace chosen partly for thermal mass and partly because it just looks awesome. Warm air from above the wood heater convects via ducts to the bathroom immediately behind the chimney, making it very cosy indeed.

Read the full article in ReNew 137.

powerwall

Australia’s first Powerwall home

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Nick Pfitzner and family are the proud owners of the first Tesla Powerwall home in Australia. Nick Pfiztner describes their configuration and the lessons they’ve learnt so far.

Our household had the privilege of the first Tesla Powerwall installation in Australia (maybe the world, they say). It has been a very interesting experience so far, and we’ve learnt a lot about what makes the house tick from an electricity point of view.  I’ve also had the opportunity to discuss the energy generation landscape with several organisations developing similar energy storage technologies.

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As a self-described Elon Musk fanboy, I became seriously interested in energy storage for our house after the Tesla Powerwall launch in 2015. I knew about other home storage systems, but mostly associated them with lead-acid systems and off-grid enthusiasts. We had previously got a quote for an off-grid AGM lead-acid system at one point, but we didn’t have the finance or space to make the BSB (big steel box) happen at that time.

However, by late last year with our finances more in order, we decided to take the plunge with the Powerwall. We chose Natural Solar as the installer. They had advertised themselves as the first certified installer of Powerwall in Australia and helped guide us through the options available.

We opted for 5 kW of Phono solar panels with a SolarEdge inverter and, of course, the Powerwall, for a total cost of $15,990 installed.

And add Reposit grid credits

Natural Solar also informed us about Reposit Power, a software package designed to maximise the benefits of home storage for the consumer. In a nutshell, Reposit is a software-based controller for the entire system. It learns the household usage patterns, gathers weather forecast data and interfaces with the inverter to make decisions about import or export of energy based on two important concepts:

Tariff arbitrage. This is the practice of switching to a time-of-use grid tariff and charging the battery at times advantageous to electricity pricing. This may occur when solar PV generation predictions for the next day are poor or where energy storage has been used up overnight. In either case, off-peak power can be imported for use the next morning.

GridCredits. This is an ARENA-supported project to investigate the use of intelligent storage and distribution of power via consumer-level battery systems, with the aim of reducing network infrastructure costs in future. Consumers are rewarded not through feed-in tariffs based on intermittent solar generation, but rather guaranteed power delivery from the battery. When the wholesale market for electricity is especially high, the electricity retailer discharges electricity from the battery into the grid, paying the consumer $1 per kWh.

These two factors could assist with the financial equation, so we figured it was worth the add-on cost of installing Reposit—an extra $800 at the time.

Read the full article in ReNew 137.

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A house built of straw

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You’re unlikely to go from building newbie to strawbale expert after a four-day workshop, but you should come out with basic skills, a better understanding of the process and the ‘right’ questions to ask. Enga Lokey explains.

THERE are many good reasons to choose to build with strawbales—better thermal performance, non-toxic material, agricultural waste product, low embodied energy, very high levels of insulation, beautiful curved walls, etc. But once you have made this decision, it may be difficult to find an architect, engineer and builder to provide the assistance you require in working with this unique medium.

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One of the best ways to give yourself the knowledge and skills necessary for a successful build is to do a strawbale workshop. If you have no prior architectural or building experience, a workshop won’t prepare you to undertake your own project from start to finish unassisted; however, you will be able to gain enough understanding to ask the right questions of the professionals you choose to employ and also gain basic strawbale building skills yourself.

What should you look for and what should you expect from a workshop? At the most basic level, participation in a workshop should provide you with enough of an understanding of what you are getting yourself into to confirm your convictions or prompt a reconsideration of your building plans. Additionally, most workshops will give you hands-on experience with some of the unique aspects of building with bales, such as alternative framing techniques, bale tying, stacking walls and corners, prepping for render and rendering.

There is a huge variety in the offerings available. Before signing up for a workshop, ask yourself what you are looking to achieve and what level of participation you plan on having in your own project. The more you expect to do yourself on your own house, the more detailed and precise your level of understanding needs to be. Are you just interested in understanding the process so you can decide if this is the type of house you want to build? Are you interested in the theory and principles of good strawbale design? Do you want to participate in every aspect of the building process or just help with the bale walls and rendering? Asking yourself these questions will make it easier to pick the correct one. Some of the major differences between courses are discussed below, followed by a chart that tries to summarise the various options on offer.

Read the full article in ReNew 136.

Image: The Natural Paint Company

The greening of paint – an eco-paint buyers guide

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Paints have become more eco-friendly in recent years, but there are still traps to look out for. Daniel Wurm explains the advantages of using environmentally friendly paints.

The painting industry has undergone a tremendous transformation over the last 10 years. Back in 2006, I was the only painter in Melbourne to have phased out toxic solvent-based paints. The rest of the industry looked at me as some kind of tree-hugging hippie when I spoke about the dangers of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) to human health and the environment. The last time I wrote for ReNew it was still difficult to find low- and zero-VOC paints, and recycling of waste was a massive issue.

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Fast forward to 2016, and I am pleased to say that my industry has taken huge strides down the path of sustainability. It’s a good news story that I am happy to tell. Green is not just a fashion statement: it’s becoming standard practice. Let’s look at some of the developments and see how far we’ve come.

First of all, low-VOC paints now make up the majority of paint sold. Almost all painters have at least tried them and all manufacturers have introduced low-VOC versions of their paints. In many cases, even their cheaper trade lines are now low-VOC. This means that low-VOC paints are available from all paint stores.

In addition, over 500 painters across Australia have been trained to identify and use low-VOC paints, and even apprentices are being taught about them as standard practice. No one argues about the health risks of solvent paints anymore; we all know there are issues and we all want to protect our health.

If any painter tries to tell you that low-VOC or zero-VOC paints will cost more or won’t last, simply walk away and find another painter. If they haven’t got the message yet, they probably never will! Almost all major projects including schools and hospitals now have low-VOC paints specified.

Low-VOC paints are categorised according to their use. For example, the Australian Paint Approval Scheme classes low-VOC low-sheen paints as having less than 5 g per litre of VOCs. We could argue about which standard to use when measuring VOCs, but that is about as interesting as watching paint dry, and VOCs are only part of the issue.

More than VOCs
I prefer to look at the whole-of-life cycle perspective. For example, some manufacturers now offer zero-VOC paints across their range and are independently certified by a recognised eco-label. Why not support these manufacturers, who have shown transparency in their manufacturing process? GECA certification (www.geca.org.au) looks at where the raw materials were sourced and what effect the manufacturing process has on the environment. To me, there is little point in choosing a low-VOC paint if the manufacturer is still producing toxic paint; true sustainability can only be achieved when manufacturers look at it holistically.

Natural paints
Natural paints are paints that are manufactured using the least amount of processing. All paints are made from chemicals, but we now know that the more humans alter raw materials, the higher risk there is of those chemicals affecting our health and the environment. I like to think of natural paints as the ‘bio-dynamic’ products of the painting industry; not everyone wants to use them, they cost more, but they minimise exposure to toxic chemicals. Natural paints are made from ingredients such as linseed oil, minerals, earth pigments, lime and beeswax. They may be a good choice for people with allergies. See the table at the end of this article for a condensed list of suppliers of natural and low-toxicity paints.

Read the full article in ReNew 136

Click here to download the full buyers guide tables in PDF format.

heating buyers guide

Heating buyers guide 2016

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Heating can be a large proportion of energy use in the home. Lance Turner looks at what efficient options are available, including hydronic and reverse-cycle air conditioners.

OUR previous heating buyers guide looked at heat pumps (commonly called reverse-cycle air conditioners) due to their high efficiency, low cost and simple installation. Later in this guide we take another look at reverse-cycle air conditioners and their advantages, and list the most efficient units currently available.

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However, there is another form of heating that not only lets you choose a heat pump as the heat source, but other energy sources as well if they are more appropriate. That system is hydronics.

Hydronic heating
THE BASICS

Hydronic systems consist of a heat source (commonly called the boiler) to heat water, and one or more pipe circuits which have the heated water flowing through them. Each circuit incorporates one or more radiators, which emit warmth into the room.

Most hydronic systems have multiple circuits, so you can heat all or only part of a home, allowing you to leave unused, closed- off rooms unheated to reduce energy use.

Water is circulated through the system using low-pressure pumps, and circuits are turned on/off by electrically operated valves, usually controlled by an electronic controller. The controller enables a system to be programmed to heat certain parts of a home at particular times—for example, heating the living areas during the evening and the bedrooms just before bedtime.

Hydronic systems are recognised to have a number of advantages over other forms of heating. The heat being either underfoot or close to it (through the use of skirting radiators or panel radiators mounted at floor level) means that you get the feeling of warmth with lower ambient room temperatures than with space heating. Also, there is generally very little air movement with hydronic heating, reducing the potential cooling effect of airflows produced by convective heating such as reverse-cycle air conditioners or ducted gas systems.

Read the full article in ReNew 135

Click here to download the full buyers guide tables in PDF format.

Tap aerators and flow restrictors

Wise water ways: At home with water efficiency

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Eva Matthews looks at the gadgets, habits and tools that can help you make the most of our precious H2O.

THE water account for 2013–14 from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals some useful facts about our water use at home. Household water consumption for the year totalled 1872 GL—equivalent to just under four Sydney Harbours. And the Sydney Harbour analogy is particularly relevant, as NSW was the highest-using of the states and territories by almost double that of the next-highest, partly because of its larger population. Per capita usage was highest in WA (361 kL) and NT (416 kL) per person per day; Victoria was the lowest at 175 kL and NSW, ACT, SA, Tasmania and Queensland were all in the range 200 to 220 kL.

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In the same time period, this water use cost households around $5 billion, and prices are rising (up around 25% on the previous year in NSW and Vic). And then there’s the fact that, despite Australia’s average rainfall being well below the global average and likely to remain so, we are the greatest per capita consumers of water, not even including the water embodied in the production of the food and products we consume. These stats make it pretty obvious that we are not, as a nation, living sustainably or smartly enough when it comes to this precious natural resource.

So what can we do to improve this situation? Primarily, use less water and make the most of the water we have! There are also national and state/territory-based rebates and incentive schemes (such as showerhead swaps, rainwater tank and greywater system rebates, appliance upgrades, toilet replacement and leak fixing services) to help people become better water savers. Check out www.yourenergysavings.gov.au/rebates for basic info and useful links.

Read the full article in ReNew 135.

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Wicking beds: Irrigation from the ground up

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Seven years ago, when permaculture design consultancy Very Edible Gardens began, they had no idea what a wicking bed was. After repeated queries from clients, they started to research and experiment. Dan Palmer, co-founder of VEG, shares the fruits of their labour.

Prior to our foray into wicking beds, all of our raised vegie beds were either unirrigated or set up with drip irrigation. But then someone whispered these words to us: “Wicking beds… We want wicking beds.” So we started setting up wicking beds in old bathtubs, and using plastic liner in standard raised beds. We set out to learn by doing, our initial intention to prove to ourselves that wicking beds didn’t work. We gave it a pretty good shot, learned a lot in the process and refined how we went about them—a good example of iterative design, where you keep doing what’s working and improve what isn’t, then repeat.

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What is a wicking bed?

Invented by Australian Colin Austin, the wicking bed idea involves the prevention of water loss from your garden bed through the use of a waterproof liner or layer. This creates a reservoir of water beneath the soil and means that, instead of watering from above via drip irrigation, a hose or a watering can, the water wicks up into the soil from below.

This keeps the soil nice and moist. You prevent the weight of the soil from squashing all the water out by having the water sit in a layer of small stones, sand or similar, which can accommodate the water while bearing the weight of the soil. You prevent the soil from dropping down into gaps between the stones or sand particles with a layer of something that lets water wick up, but stops soil moving down. The last essential piece of the wicking bed puzzle is that you need a designated overflow point so that the soil layer doesn’t get flooded and kill the soil life and plants by rotting their roots.

Read the full article in ReNew 135.

how_green

How green is my solar?

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How long does it take to pay back the energy used in the production of solar + battery systems and how much of an effect do they have on the greenness of the grid? The ATA’s Andrew Reddaway investigates.

By generating clean electricity, solar systems reduce the amount of coal and gas that’s burned in power stations. This reduces pollutants and greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere, which cause disease and man-made climate change. Fossil fuels also require extractive processes such as fracking and open-cut coal mining, which have led to negative effects on the environment such as land degradation, water contamination and mine fires.

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It seems clear that installing a solar system will have a positive effect on the environment. But with several different types of system now available, including systems with batteries, how do they compare in terms of the environment?

Grid-connected without batteries

The vast majority of existing solar systems are connected to the grid and have no batteries. Your solar panels’ electricity is first used by on-site appliances, and any excess is exported to the grid to be consumed by your neighbours. Any shortfalls are supplied from the grid. This setup is relatively cheap and efficient, using a simple inverter that relies on the grid for its stability. However, it’s not very self-sufficient, because if a grid blackout occurs the inverter will switch off. (Although not always; some rare grid-connect inverters can use direct solar generation to supply household appliances in a blackout, even without batteries; for example, the Nedap PowerRouter.)

Since the grid has minimal energy storage, whenever your solar system is operating, a centralised power station will reduce its output to compensate. Each kilowatt-hour of solar generation reduces power station generation accordingly. In fact the benefit is even greater, as the power station must supply not only the end-user demand but also the losses incurred in the power lines, which can be over 20% for remote locations. Some people argue that because coal-fired power stations are inflexible, they’ll keep consuming coal at the same rate regardless of solar generation. Actually they are responsive enough; for example, Loy Yang A in Victoria can halve its output in less than an hour. Spread out over a geographically large area, solar systems’ overall impact is relatively gradual even when a cloud front arrives; this is forecast and managed by the grid operator in five-minute intervals.

With enough panels you can generate more electricity than you consume over a whole year, with your night-time imports more than compensated for by your daytime exports.

Read the full article in ReNew 135.

DIY double glazing

Double glazing on a budget

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Double glazing can be very expensive, but with a bit of care and patience you can add double glazing to existing windows without breaking the bank. Alan Cotterill shows us how.

Built in 2002, my four-bedroom brick veneer house has stock standard powder-coated aluminium windows and doors. With my previous efforts to retrofit for energy savings and thermal comfort (see ‘Efficiency on a budget’ in ReNew 130), I had already fitted effective shading for my windows in the warmer weather. As I understand it, this is a prerequisite if double glazing is not going to be counterproductive in summer. But for winter, double-glazed windows insulate and thus hold in the heat much better than a single-glazed pane. Thus, I embarked on a project to retrofit my windows with a second (acrylic) pane.

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Materials
For the additional panes, I used 3 mm cast acrylic sheet accurately cut to size commercially by The Plastics Factory. They cut 34 panels within a tolerance of 1 mm to my requested dimensions. Accurate measuring by myself was of paramount importance for this! Buying direct from a wholesaler meant a good saving; in fact, the cost was around half that of uncut sheets from local retail outlets.

I adhered the acrylic sheet to the aluminium surrounds of each panel of glass using highly flexible silicone sealant. The reasons for this choice were two-fold.

Firstly, the linear expansion rate from a change in temperature is significantly different between the acrylic sheet and the aluminium frame, with the acrylic expanding at three times the rate of the aluminium. With a 1200 mm edge and a temperature change from 0 to 40 °C, the acrylic would expand nearly 4 mm more than the aluminium frame. Flexibility of the sealant would cater for this to some extent.

Secondly, if a glass panel needs replacing down the track or a return to single glazing is desired, the silicone sealant could be scraped off (although still a tedious, fiddly job!)

Read the full article in ReNew 135.

green_roof

ATA member profile: We heart Tankulator

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From studying environmental science, to working in the urban stormwater sector, to installing an intensive green roof on top of her home, ATA member Claire Hanley talks to Sarah Coles about community engagement with water.

Claire Hanley is an environmental scientist working with Marrickville Council in the urban stormwater sector. She works with the Waterevolution team and manages small infrastructure projects and the urban water education program, which includes workshops on water-sensitive urban design and rainwater harvesting. The three-part water-sensitive design series has a hands-on component: “In part three we go to someone’s house and build a stormwater treatment device. It’s usually a rain garden, but we’ve done wetlands and greywater systems as well.”

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A few years ago Marrickville Council ran water workshops in five languages (Arabic, Vietnamese, Portuguese, Mandarin and Greek) at the library with the Ethnic Communities Council. Claire makes an interesting point: “Often people from non-English-speaking backgrounds come from countries where water hasn’t been readily available and has been considered a real resource. They’re really aware of water issues because they lived with not having water on tap.”

Marrickville Council are soon to launch a program aimed at helping residents to stencil the slogan ‘We are all Cooks River People— water in drain flows to the Cooks River’ on top of the drains, to alert people to where their stormwater goes.

The council is known for its rain gardens, and one suspects Claire has a lot to do with this. The Scouller Street rain garden was completed with the Cooks River Alliance in 2015, and it has transformed the dangerous, hot and polluted intersection. The council worked with the community to design rain gardens on either side of the road with a sharper turning angle to slow down traffic.

They had a community planting day last year: “We had over 50 locals turn up on a Saturday morning to plant out the gardens.” A University of Western Sydney microbiologist has been doing research into pollution reduction at the site and the test results are encouraging.

Claire and her husband have also completed an eco renovation of their 1920s semi-detached house. “The rear of the house had a tin roof,” says Claire, “and was boiling hot in summer and freezing cold in winter.  So we demolished the back of the house and rebuilt with a green roof on top.” The green roof keeps the house cooler in summer and warmer in winter. Additional benefits include reductions in both impervious surfaces and the urban heat island effect.

They needed extensive engineering assistance to design/install the green roof, as it weighs so much; council regulations required engineering diagrams. It has a deep soil profile of about 350 mm and includes a drainage system. The roof was lined with a waterproof liner and the soil pumped from a truck onto the roof.

The result is a 45 m2 intensive green roof, planted with natives which have proved effective in providing habitat. A student at Macquarie University conducted a biodiversity study using Claire’s green roof, favourably comparing the amount of invertebrate activity on green versus conventional roofs. Claire adds, “Our neighbours like it because their verandahs overlook our roof. We’re making their day better!”

Claire became an ATA member because of a love of Tankulator, the ATA’s online rain harvesting calculator. She says, “We always recommend Tankulator to people in our council rainwater workshops. “And it is great getting ReNew magazine,” she adds.

This member profile is published in ReNew 135. Buy your copy here.

Glenn Evans reading the electricity meter with clients John and Lea Mungbando

A tropical take: smart cooling in the tropics

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A Northern Territory program that works with low-income residents to reduce their energy bills and improve their comfort is starting to see results. Robyn Deed talks to one of the energy assessors about his approach and how the project is progressing.

ReNew first reported on COOLmob’s Smart Cooling in the Tropics project in December 2014, when the project was just starting. Since then, 480 households have had initial home visits and many have had upgrades applied to their homes.

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Data is also being collected. This is the first large-scale project to identify and measure the best approaches to cooling, comfort and energy efficiency in tropical Australia. The outcomes will be used to inform national energy policy, and to influence building codes and rating systems to make them appropriate for the tropics.
The research findings will consider a range of factors including which treatments produced the biggest energy cost savings, which households achieved improvements in comfort levels, and which participants gained better awareness of energy consumption issues and opportunities.

While the evaluation phase is only just starting some early anecdotal observations are giving a flavour of the evidence to come, says Project Manager Jessica Steinborner: “The two primary issues identified through the home visits are heat gain and air flow.”

Heat gain

  • Many homes have no or inadequate shading and a number have dark roofs.
  • A high proportion of homes assessed have outside walls of high thermal mass.

By the end of the project, nearly a quarter of participating homes will have had a heat prevention solution such as shading or reflective roof paint.

“Shading has been a really popular treatment. In addition to preventing heat gain, shading creates a protected outdoor living space away from the hot concrete interiors of their homes,” says Jessica.

Air flow

  • Ventilation is often restricted either as a result of the orientation or because of the design, with windows and doors poorly located to capture a prevailing breeze.
  • Many homes have fly screens in disrepair and consequently not in use, leading to houses being shut up with the air conditioner on.

Half of the households will have received a treatment addressing air flow including upgrades to their doors and windows to facilitate passive cooling and upgrades to their fans (ceiling, wall and floor).

Other observations and some surprises

  • The majority of participants are home during the day and, despite reporting the highest discomfort in the afternoon, they were opting to not use the air conditioner until the evening.
  • Average number of air conditioners was three and average temperature setting was 24 °C.
  • On average, participants were using 26 kWh/day, the average usage for Darwin.

Until more data is available, it’s great to hear comments like this: “I have lived in Darwin for 15 years and this is the first time I’ve felt cool and comfortable during the wet season,” says Mieme, one of the participants.

Read the interview with one of the energy assessors in ReNew 134.

ecoMaster measuring up for draughtproofing

A focus on thermal efficiency

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Energy efficiency is perhaps the most critical aspect of sustainable living, yet it’s oft-ignored and subject to changing government policies. Robyn Deed talks to Lyn Beinat from ecoMaster about the changes she’s seen in the energy efficiency industry and her top tips for householders.

Energy assessment business ecoMaster has seen many government policy introductions and exits over the 11 years they’ve been in business. They’ve had to constantly adapt. “Even changes to solar panel rebates and the RET have affected us, although we don’t deal with solar products,” says ecoMaster CEO Lyn Beinat. Government support is crucial to confidence. Lyn comments, “Perhaps people decide it’s all too hard or likely to be too costly when the government support isn’t there.”

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The biggest shift in ecoMaster’s approach has been that they now look at the whole house right from the start. Lyn says, “It’s not that we want people to do everything all at once, but we’ve found that people are often focusing on just one aspect, like secondary glazing, when that may not be the most important thing to look at. The biggest problem is often draughts.”

Another change they didn’t expect at all has been a move into product development. Their research and work on their own home, and with clients, has led them in that direction. Maurice Beinat (Lyn’s husband and ecoMaster’s Chief Technical Officer) has done a lot of energy efficiency assessments (“more than anyone on the planet!” claims Lyn) and through that they identified problems that needed better solutions.

For example, for draughtproofing, Lyn says there are many products available, but it’s hard to find ones that are going to last: “many of the stick-on draught excluders will only last a year or so before they start peeling off, or they’ll cause problems for door closing,” notes Lyn.

Read the full article, including approximate costs for thermal efficiency changes, and Lyn’s top tips in ReNew 134.

Earthship Ironbank

Off-grid meets reuse

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It’s taken a few years, but Australia’s first permitted earthship is almost ready to set sail in its new life as B&B accomodation, and as a living laboratory. Read all about it here.

Read more articles on reuse and recycling in ReNew 133.