ATA member profile: Spreading the word on sustainability

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Long-time convenor of the ATA’s Perth branch, Travis Hargreaves tells Anna Cumming about his experiences in the retail solar sector and his real passion—educating people on sustainability and equipping them with the knowledge to continue the conversation.

ORIGINALLY from Melbourne, Travis Hargreaves took off around Australia on his motorbike when he was 20. “I went here, there and everywhere, then I ended up in Perth and met my partner, and the rest is history.” Travis has been in Perth ever since and is a stalwart of the sustainability movement there.

“I always had an interest in sustainability and the environment,” says Travis.

Ten years ago he decided to get proactive and do some study in renewable energy; the TAFE in Perth didn’t offer a dedicated course, so instead, Travis was one of just two students that year who undertook a Diploma in Electrotechnology, which covered renewable energy as one of its four subject areas.

At the same time, he started up his first solar business: “The market was small at the time. I provided solar system design, sales and installation services for three solar retailers,” he explains. In 2010 he set up a solar retailer that services Perth and southern WA with solar and battery storage system design and installation.

Travis has far more on his plate than simply running his business though. When the ATA’s Perth branch was set up, Travis got involved and was swiftly asked to become the convenor, a role he’s held since 2009.

Through the activities of the ATA branch, Travis has become a sought-after speaker on sustainability and it’s this educational role that inspires him the most.

“Consumers are wanting to get past the talking and have the information to take action,” he says. “I started talking about energy efficiency and the importance of making those changes before investing in solar. Then I developed presentations on the basics of solar panels and battery storage, then about three years ago I started promoting electric vehicles, and now vehicle-to-grid technology.”

“I like my audience to leave inspired but also frustrated and wanting to push for change; I try to give them the knowledge to continue the conversation. Rather than bombarding them with technical information, I provide them with arguments for why we should be heading down this path so they can have conversations with their neighbours and explain the benefits—to living costs, local job creation and, of course, the environment.”



Lobbying for renewables and the jobs that go with it at the Rally for Renewables in Perth in 2014.


Travis has been involved with several other environmental advocacy groups. He was the WA branch president of the Australian Solar Council in 2014 and 2015, and instrumental in the 2014 Rally for Renewables campaign in Perth which brought together a host of organisations to lobby for legislation favouring renewable energy.

He’s also proud of a successful joint campaign to protest and reverse the WA state government’s decision to remove the solar feed-in tariff in 2013.

While Tony Abbott was prime minister, local representatives from both the Australian Solar Council and Clean Energy Council met with Liberal senators in WA to discuss local renewable energy and the potential benefits to the community.

It was useful education for Travis. “I think we were successful to a certain extent, but I also became aware of how the politics around renewable energy worked. They understood, but were toeing the party line.”

Travis is quietly keen to keep on pushing for change. “I got involved with the ATA because of its independent voice and its mission to provide information to the community. That’s what I continue to do today—use my knowledge to educate and influence people and inspire them to take action.”

This member profile is published in Renew 141. Buy your copy here.

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